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I’m one of those realistic writers who knows what people mean when they see an article you’ve published, and they say, “it looks good.”

They usually mean that literally, i.e. it looks good—there is a nice (printed or web) page layout, maybe an interesting photo with a helpful caption, the words are arranged attractively on the page.

That makes sense. Images transmit information faster. Try this example.

text vs. graphics

So when introducing yourself or your business on your web page, why don’t you try a one minute video introduction in addition to posting your story or bibliography? This is a rather new concept. Everyone knows the phrase ”elevator talk,” but google “one minute video introduction” and you’ll see some mighty slim pickings indeed.

(There is indeed one bright spot. This introduction is great, but also was likely done by a professional.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUG9qYTJMsI

dollarshaveclub

Here’s my own video, shot on my cellphone, which was held on a tripod:

Video Intro or Bio?

Academic Bio for Debbie Merion

Debbie Merion, MFA, MSW is the founder of Essay Coaching (essaycoaching.com), where she coaches student and adult writers to grab their pens and laptops and write to a level of excellence. She is the eBook Editor at Solstice Literary Magazine, and the author of Solving the College Admissions Puzzle. Her work has appeared in the Barnes and Noble Review, Solstice, The Bear River Review, Hour Detroit, the Ann Arbor Observer, and Choice Magazine. She has received a Gold Medal in the Global Ebook Awards, and an Excellence in Journalism Award from the Detroit Society of Professional Journalists.

 

This blog covers the WXW workshop on April 16, 2015 called “How to Write a One-Minute Script to Introduce Yourself by Video” AKA Say AND Show it.  “The event is at Mediterrano Restaurant in Ann Arbor, Michigan from 11:30am-1:30pm.  Read more about this event here.

If all goes as planned (the event hasn’t happened yet) this is what was said.

 

Three Major Points to Remember When Writing

memory

1.  Repetition can be your friend.

 

vision

2 Images make more of an impact than words.  

Write word pictures.

 

attention

3  Saying you are awesome isn’t awesome.

We pay attention to (and remember) examples.

 

What We Remember

  • Pictures and Metaphors—Readers form images in their minds of the situations and people you describe in your essay.  “I think of myself as a sneaker” was a metaphor used as a theme in a college essay that remained memorable over the years to one college admissions counselor.  Make sure that a metaphor is explained and fits well for the idea you want to communicate.
  • Names—names of people, places, books.
  • Sensory details—colors, smells, sounds, textures, tastes.
  • Nouns—Interesting things, things that mean something to you.  For example, your piano, your ice skates, your grandfather’s watch.
  • Dialogue—Phrases said that are pithy, wise, honest, funny, or perfect for the moment and the speaker.
  • Emotions—Either described in the essay, or aroused in the readers. See The Emotion Thesaurus.
  • Surprises—Story surprises can delight us, just like surprise parties and gift surprises do.
  • Numbers and values—For example, the above list provided eight ways to make your essay memorable.

 

Two truths and a Lie

  • People can remember 1000 images at an average of 63% after two years
  • The longer the video, the less the attention of the watcher
  • 87% of statistics are made up on the spot

 

Memory, Vision and Attention images from Brain Rules Illustrated

Graphic description image courtesy of  info.shiftelearning.com

Pinterest folder of informative images supporting my talk

For a chuckle read my latest story, published by Barnes and Noble:  Dear Sapphire Cross, . My other published stories are here at debbiemerion.com.

 

Demonstration of Uploading the Video

IMG_0879 IMG_0880 IMG_0881 IMG_0883 IMG_0884

 

 Additional Videos

A 10 second video

A two minute video

Meg Fairchild

 

 

 The End.

2012-12-15 13.41.27

 

 

One Response to “How to Write a Script for a One Minute Introductory Video”

  1. Joanne says:

    Great video!
    Love the last line:
    “I’m Debbie Merion, your writing coach.”
    That sums it up.

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